Building in contingencies

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Dr Mark HassedA while ago I was visiting a practice and there was a major screaming match going on at the front desk.

It turned out that the dentist had quoted $1,600 for a crown. During the preparation the old filling had come out and so the dentist had made a core. The dentist added $250 to the fee.

The patient felt cheated and rightly so in my view. They had been quoted one fee and at the front desk handed an account for a higher amount.

That leads me to an excellent rule to live by: Always quote high.

If you think an extraction might be a surgical quote for a 324. If you think a core might be needed add it to the quote. If you think a filling might need cusp coverage add it in.

You can always bring your fee down and patients are delighted when you do so.

But if you go up you risk a major negative incident with a patient.

When you prepare a quote do you always quote high?


Dentist

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Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For e.g. How to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more.

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