Things I learnt running an art show (5)

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As I mentioned last week, I recently managed perhaps the largest charity art show in Australia.

It was a great success with profit up 84% from the previous year. Here are some of the things I learnt along the way.

Lesson 4: Show your gratitude.

There is no doubt that dental staff work for the money but they also want to be appreciated. They love to be told that they’ve done a good job.

At the art show we had someone who contributed absolutely nothing but turned up at the end to announce the result and claim credit for themselves.

It left all the willing and diligent workers feeling flat. They’d worked so hard and this person swanned in at the end and claimed the glory. Definitely not recommended!

With your dental staff it pays to be humble. Truly humble.

Sure, we know that you’re the dentist but whenever something good happens don’t claim it. Instead be full of praise for the people around you and say something like “You’re great. Thanks so much. We couldn’t have done it without you.”

That will lift your team up and motivate them.

Another lesson next week…


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance
(1-day Masterclass)

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For example, how to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more.

Sydney 26 August – click here for details.

Efficient Dentistry – Dates to be advised.


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Things I learnt running an art show (4)

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As I mentioned last week, I recently managed perhaps the largest charity art show in Australia.

It was a great success with profit up 84% from the previous year. Here are some of the things I learnt along the way.

Lesson 3: Sometimes “no” is the right answer.

Among people involved in customer service there is often the belief that “the customer is always right”.

This belief can lead to wasting time and money trying to satisfy unjustifiable and uneconomic requests.

At an art show an artist says they would like to make an entry after the closing date for entries. The correct answer is “no”.

In dental practice a patient who has failed two previous appointments wants to make another one. The correct answer is “no”.

A patient says they would like to take an account. The correct answer is “no”.

A patient asks for a discount. The correct answer is “no”.

I’m sure you get the idea. Saying “yes” to every request a patient makes leads you into servicing a bunch of ungrateful time-wasters.

Don’t fall for it.

Another lesson next week…


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance
(1-day Masterclass)

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For example, how to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more.

Sydney 26 August – click here for details.

Efficient Dentistry – Dates to be advised.


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The Top 6 Attributes of a Good Communicator

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What are the attributes of good communicators?


In this article, I will share six attributes that separate good communicators from ordinary ones.

1. Fast

Good communicators don’t take all day — in fact, it’s the opposite. When explaining treatment, bad communicators waffle around for 15, 30 or even 45 minutes. They take ages to get to the point. Good communicators, by contrast, deliver a short, crisp, clear treatment explanation. In two minutes or less the patient has all the information they need to make a decision.

 

2. Easy to understand

Bad communicators use jargon. They explain lots of technical details that the patient doesn’t need to know. They draw diagrams, point out things on x-rays and generally bamboozle. On the other hand, good communicators speak in plain English and just give the patient the information that they need to know.

 

3. Good success rate

Because bad communicators can’t explain treatment clearly to patients they have trouble getting case acceptance. Typically they do 20 items or less of indirect restorative dentistry per month. Good communicators can do 50 or more items of indirect restorative dentistry per month.

 

4. Low stress for the dentist

If you have good communication skills presenting a full mouth case is no more difficult or stressful than doing a Class I filling — in fact it is easier. Getting stressed when discussing treatment with patients is a sure sign that you don’t know what you are doing. By contrast, if you have mastered communication then you just relax and go with the flow.

 

5. Low stress for the patient

Pressuring patients is absolutely undesirable. Apart from being ethically questionable, it can also lead to conflict and patients dropping out of the practice. Bad communicators use phrases like “You really should…” and “You need…” in an effort to cajole patients into treatment. Good communicators are totally fair in how they present treatment options and never, ever pressure patients.

 

6. Covers you

Good communicators make modest claims for treatment and are open about drawbacks. They warn the patient of likely adverse outcomes so that patients know what they are in for. They make sure a patient’s expectations are reasonable prior to treatment. Bad communicators don’t do these things and so, when an adverse outcome occurs, it is a real disaster and can cause conflict.

 


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For example, how to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more. Click on the links below for more details.

Sydney 26 August. | Adelaide 7 October. | Perth 2 December.

The Art of Efficient Dentistry

Dates to be advised.


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Things I learnt running an art show (3)

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As I mentioned last week, I recently managed perhaps the largest charity art show in Australia.

It was a great success with profit up 84% from the previous year. Here are some of the things I learnt along the way.

Lesson 2: Find the right niche for people.

Obviously every person has their own set of abilities. Everyone is great at some things, good at some things and lousy at other things.

Highly successful businesses free people up to focus on the things they are great at and keep them away from the things they’re lousy at.

If you ask people to do things that they’re lousy at what happens is that they become frustrated, unproductive and demotivated. The pace of work slows to a crawl.

At the art show we had a person who was brilliant at art and another person who was brilliant at infrastructure. My job, as manager, was to free up the art person to concentrate solely on that and the infrastructure person to focus solely on that.

In your practice do you have the right people doing the right tasks? Some people are fantastic on the telephone, some people are terrible. Some people love paperwork, some people hate it.

Have you as manager structured things so people are in their happy, productive niches? A person who loves paperwork will get through five times as much in a day as someone who hates it. They will also be constantly creative and finding improvements.

Another lesson next week…


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For example, how to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more. Click on the links below for more details.

Sydney 26 August. | Adelaide 7 October. | Perth 2 December.

The Art of Efficient Dentistry

Dates to be advised.


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Things I learnt running an art show (2)

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As I mentioned last week, I recently managed perhaps the largest charity art show in Australia.

It was a great success with profit up 84% from the previous year. Here are some of the things I learnt along the way.

Lesson 1: Get rid of toxic people.

An art show, a dental practice or any business cannot afford to have toxic people. They walk around whining, complaining and bringing everyone down.

Among the dental practices I’ve visited I have seen some absolute shockers.

In one it was the practice manager who used to start every day with a “team” meeting where she administered a verbal flogging to all in attendance.

At the art show we had someone who found everything to be “disgraceful”, “hopeless” or “worst ever”.

If you want to run a successful practice you simply cannot have such people around. Get rid of them.

You would be better off running things with less staff and working harder than put up with toxic people.

At the practice I mentioned above, morale, productivity and profit shot up the instant the toxic staff member was eliminated. Same at the art show.

A great line for such people is: “I don’t know how we are ever going to get along without you but, starting tomorrow, we will try.”

Life is too short.

Another lesson next week…


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance
(1-day Masterclass)

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For example, how to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more.

Sydney 26 August – click here for details.
Adelaide 16 September – click here for details.
Perth 2 December – click here for details.

Efficient Dentistry – Dates to be advised.


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Things I learnt running an art show (1)

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Recently I managed perhaps the largest charity art show in Australia.

Over 10 days our team exhibited around 1,300 works from approximately 400 artists and turned over hundreds of thousands of dollars.

I freely admit that my knowledge of art is minimal but I took on the challenge as an interest and to raise money for charity.

What I learnt I intend to share over a series of blog posts over the coming months.

But, in case you’re worried, these blog posts will be about the lessons that I learnt that apply equally to dentistry (or, in fact, any business).

Things such as teamwork, staff, problem solving, decision making, systems, answering questions from the public, who to have as customers (and who not to), dealing with difficult suppliers and a whole lot more.

It has been a fascinating journey running an art show and I hope you find the lessons I take from it to be highly useful in your practice.


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance
(1-day Masterclass)

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For example, how to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more.

Sydney 26 August – click here for details.
Adelaide 16 September – click here for details.
Perth 2 December – click here for details.

Efficient Dentistry – Dates to be advised.


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It’s a no-brainer. Buy one!

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Dr Mark Hassed

A friend said to me recently “I followed your advice.”

That’s always an interesting statement because I try to remember what that advice was and sincerely hope that it worked out well.

In this case the advice was to buy an OPG machine. The dentist was over the moon with the results.

I advise every single dentist who asks to buy an OPG machine for their practice. To me it’s a no-brainer because an OPG, if used properly, pays for itself in a year or less. There’s no other piece of equipment that gives such a wonderful return on investment.

If you take 400 OPGs a year (an easy task) then it will generate fee revenue of $40,000 which exceeds the purchase cost of an OPG unit.

But, let’s leave aside the fee revenue. Here are more reasons why an OPG is brilliant.

  1. You find unexpected work.
  2. You reduce mistakes.
  3. An OPG is the only x-ray patients can understand. A single tooth with an abscess stands out.
  4. An overall view makes treatment planning easier.

So, if your practice doesn’t have an OPG you really need to question why.

You can quote me on that!


Dentist

Upcoming Seminars

The Art of Case Acceptance
(1-day Masterclass)

Learn how to get patients to accept the treatment they need. For e.g. How to present expensive treatment without the risk of losing the patient to the dentist down the street, and so much more.

Sydney 26 August – click here for details.
Adelaide 16 September – click here for details.
Perth 2 December – click here for details.

Efficient Dentistry – Dates to be advised.


therelaxeddentist.com | Facebook/TheRelaxedDentist

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